Suicide Prevention

If you think you or someone you know could be suicidal, please call 911 immediately. If you are concerned about yourself, don’t wait. Talk to a caring professional:

  • Visit CSU Health Network Counseling Services: CSU Health & Medical Center, 151 W. Lake St. Walk-in hours: M-F 7:30am to 4:30pm; Tuesdays 7:30am to 7:30pm
  • Call CSU Health Network Counseling Services: (970) 491-7121 Mental Health Crisis Intervention (CSU): (970) 491-7111
  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline1-800-273-TALK (8255) This is a 24-hour, toll-free, confidential suicide prevention hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.
  • The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline and online chat. Call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1
  • The Trevor Project provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth. They have established the Trevor Lifeline that you can call at 1-866-488-7386 to speak with a trained volunteer with specific sensitivity to LGBTQ issues.

Concerned About Someone Else? Tell Someone.

Concerned about another CSU student or employee’s mental health and safety? There may be times that you become concerned about CSU student or university employee. We encourage you to Tell Someone. People who may be experiencing an emotional difficulty or mental health illness may show specific signs that they need help. When in doubt, it is always best to Tell Someone! Know you can call (970) 491-1350 to discuss concerns about any member of the CSU community. Referrals will be made to campus resources that can develop strategies and use resources to discreetly help students and employees who may be in distress. Referrals may also be made using the online Health and Safety Referral Form. If a student or employee appears to be an imminent risk of causing harm to self or others, call the CSU Police Department at (970) 491-6425 and/or 911 immediately.

Assessments

Your mental health is often at the heart of your personal and academic success.

  • Take an anonymous screening to check in with how you are feeling.
  • Are you a veteran in emotional distress? Explore this self-check quiz.
  • Visit Half of Us to check yourself. Half of Us is a collaboration with mtvU and the Jed Foundation to initiate a public dialogue to raise awareness about the prevalence of mental health issues on campus and connect students to the appropriate resources to get help.
  • Explore Ulifeline, an online resource center, where college students can be comfortable searching for the information they need and want regarding mental health and suicide prevention.

Suicide Warning Signs and Symptoms

Seek help as soon as possible by contacting a mental health professional (in Campus Resources tab below) or by calling the Suicide Prevention Hotline 1-800-273-TALK (8255) if you or someone you know exhibits any of the following signs. If there is immediate risk, call 911.

  • Threatening to hurt or kill oneself or talking about wanting to hurt or kill oneself.
  • Looking for ways to kill oneself by seeking access to firearms, available pills or other means.
  • Feeling trapped like there is no way out of a situation
  • Thinking of oneself as a burden to others
  • Showing violent behavior; feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge.
  • Increasing alcohol and/or drug use.
  • Giving away prized possessions.
  • Withdrawing from friends, family, and society.
  • Feeling anxious agitated or unable to sleep or sleeping all the time.
  • Acting reckless or engaging in risky activities seemingly without thinking.
  • Feeling hopeless.
  • Experiencing dramatic mood changes.
  • Seeing no reason for living or having no sense of purpose in life.

Adapted from: The Jed Foundation

For Veterans

Many people experience emotional distress due to a wide variety of stressful situations. For Veterans, these crises can be heightened by their experiences during military service. When emotional issues reach a crisis point, it’s time to call on the Veterans Crisis Line for support at 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1. Some specific signs that deserve immediate attention include:

  • Looking for ways to kill oneself
  • Talking about death, dying, or suicide
  • Rage or anger
  • Engaging in risky activities without thinking
  • Self-destructive behavior such as drug abuse, weapons, etc

self-check quiz is available through the VA in collaboration with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

General Information

According to the Jed Foundation, most people who are suicidal desperately want to live but are unable to find another way to cope with their thoughts or feelings. Unfortunately one in ten college students has considered suicide. It is the second leading cause of death among college students. Almost all college students who die by suicide are suffering from an emotional disorder, most commonly depression. Learn more about prevalence rates, protective factors and suicide prevention from the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC).

Campus Resources

The CSU Health Network is here for you! Talk to a caring professional:

  • Visit CSU Health Network Counseling Services: CSU Health & Medical Center, 151 W. Lake St. Walk-in hours: M-F 7:30am to 4:30pm; Tuesdays 7:30am to 7:30pm
  • Call CSU Health Network Counseling Services: (970) 491-7121 Mental Health Crisis Intervention (CSU): (970) 491-7111

Student in need of medical assistance:

For additional information about suicide prevention:

At CSU, The Adult Learner and Veterans Services office has an abundance of resources, services, programs and a great lounge for adult learners and student Veterans.

  • Visit Room 195 in the Lory Student Center
  • Call (970) 491-3977

At CSU, The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center is a safe space for LGBT people, other sexual minorities and allies within the CSU community for educational outreach, advocacy, visibility of LGBTQ issues, information and referral, and academic and leadership opportunities.

  • Visit Room 174 in the Lory Student Center
  • Call (970) 491-4342

At CSU, there are a number of Diversity Centers that can offer particular support, resources and appreciation of multi-culturalism to diverse student groups.

Local Resources

The Alliance for Suicide Prevention is a local resource with specific support opportunities and prevention strategies for Larimer County. SummitStone Health Partners is the local non-profit healthcare provider for Larimer County residents who support consumers of all ages through innovation-driven, compassionate and comprehensive treatment of mental illness, behavioral disorders, and substance abuse.

Websites

  • American Association of Suicidology (AAS) promotes research, public awareness programs, public education, and training for professionals and volunteers. AAS also serves as a national clearinghouse for information on suicide.
  • The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention is dedicated to advancing our knowledge of suicide and our ability to prevent it. Find helpful information on suicide prevention, along with articles and recent publications.
  • The Department of Veterans Affairs provides many resources and information specific to issues of suicide among Veterans.
  • Half of Us is a collaboration with mtvU and the Jed Foundation to initiate a public dialogue to raise awareness about the prevalence of mental health issues on campus and connect students to the appropriate resources to get help.
  • The Jed Foundation is a leading organization working to reduce emotional distress and prevent suicide among college students.
  • The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control is working to raise awareness of suicide as a serious public health problem and is focusing on science-based prevention strategies to reduce injuries and deaths due to suicide.
  • National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) helps to diminish the burden of mental illness through research. This public health mandate demands powerful scientific tools to achieve better understanding, treatment, and eventually prevention of mental illness.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273- 8255 (TALK) is a free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Your call will be routed to the nearest crisis center near you.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources, is focused on providing help for those suffering from mental health and substance abuse problems.
  • Suicide Prevention Advocacy Network (SPAN) USA is people in communities across the country: families who have lost a loved one to suicide; people who have attempted suicide or struggled with suicidal thoughts, and their families; professionals serving families and communities; community leaders; and concerned citizens.
  • The Suicide Prevention Coalition of Colorado works to reduce suicide and its impact for all Coloradans through advocacy,collaboration and education.
  • The Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) provides prevention support, training, and resources to assist organizations and individuals to develop suicide prevention programs, interventions and policies, and to advance the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention.
  • To Write Love on Her Arms is a non-profit movement dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury and suicide. TWLOHA exists to encourage, inform, inspire and also to invest directly into treatment and recovery.
  • The Trevor Project provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth.
  • Ulifeline is an online resource center where college students can be comfortable searching for the information they need and want regarding mental health and suicide prevention.